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Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

3 edition of Development of western spruce budworm on Douglas-fir callus tissue found in the catalog.

Development of western spruce budworm on Douglas-fir callus tissue

R. C. Beckwith

Development of western spruce budworm on Douglas-fir callus tissue

by R. C. Beckwith

  • 17 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station in [Portland, Or. (319 S.W. Pine St., Portland 97208)] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Western spruce budworm -- Northwestern States,
  • Douglas fir -- Diseases and pests -- Northwestern States

  • Edition Notes

    StatementRoy C. Beckwith and Barry Goldfarb
    SeriesResearch note PNW -- RN-504, Research note PNW -- 504
    ContributionsGoldfarb, Barry, Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination5 p. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13614022M

    books. This book is a synthesis of current knowledge about the insect and its hosts. It summarizes most of the known information on the western spruce budworm and provides background for the recommendations contained in two management books: Managin f^ Trees and Stands Susceptible to Western Spruce Budworm, and. We addressed whether the western spruce budworm influences nutrient and water relations, ectomycorrhizae, leaf gas exchange, and growth of Douglas-fir seedlings under different environmental.

    Page 4 Back to menu Western Spruce Budworm Habitat Types Western spruce budworm defoliation occurs in 46 habitat types described for Montana (Fellin et al. ); across much of Montana and part of Idaho. They fall in these habitat type series— x Douglas-fir x spruce x grand fir x western red cedar x western hemlock x lower elevations of. We model the population of the spruce budworm, which is an insect that is the most widely distributed and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in Western North America. Its population may be modeled by a logistic differential equation with the addition of a .

    Foliage Dynamics and Tree Damage Components of the Western Spruce Budworm Modeling System, , General Technical Report, INT 40 pages with illustrations. [Crookston, N. L.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Foliage Dynamics and Tree Damage Components of the Western Spruce Budworm Modeling System, , General Technical ReportAuthor: N. L. Crookston. Southern hybridization, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and a novel DNA extraction/PCR assay were used to detect Orgyia pseudotsugata multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (OpMNPV) in Douglas-fir tussock moth larvae. PCR was more sensitive than Southern hybridization and ELISA at detecting semipurified by: 6.


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Development of western spruce budworm on Douglas-fir callus tissue by R. C. Beckwith Download PDF EPUB FB2

Occidentalis Freeman) larvae on callus tissue derived from Douglas-fir cotyledons. We found that western spruce budworm la rvae can be successfully reared on either pure callus or callus incorporated into an artificial diet.

The western spruce budworms used in. The Development of western spruce budworm on Douglas-fir callus tissue book of feeding and development of western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) on callus tissue of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) was determined.

Fewer insects died when fed pure callus tissue than when fed on standard diet or callus incorporated into the standard diet. Development of western spruce budworm on Douglas-fir callus tissue Author: R C Beckwith ; Barry Goldfarb ; Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.).

Most western spruce budworm outbreaks occur east of the Cascade Mountains crest in mixed conifer stands. Large, contiguous expanses of dense, multilayered forests dominated by white or grand firs and Douglas-fir provide ideal habitat for this insect, especially when forests are growing in areas that historically were dominated by fire-climax pine stands.

Western spruce budworm is the most widely distributed forest defoliator in western North America. Budworms have a one-year life cycle and are actually a small moth at full maturity. Here in the West, there can be severe infestations in healthy Douglas-fir, white fir and spruce.

Figure 6.— Douglas-fir bud mined by third-stage western spruce budworm larva. Note lar-val webbing and frass at entrance hole. flush, larvae spin loose webs among the needles and feed on the new foli-age.

As shoots continue to elongate and needles develop, adjacent shoots often are webbed together by the lar-vae and begin to appear twisted or FFile Size: KB.

The western spruce budworm, Choristoneura occidentalis, is the most widely distributed and destructive forest defoliator in western North America. In the Rockies, they most commonly infest Douglas-fir and white fir.

Occasionally, they also attack Engelmann spruce, blue spruce and sub-alpine fir. Identification. Spruce budworms handbook: predators of the spruce budworm U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Cooperative State Research Service, - Predation (Biology) - 77 pages 0 Reviews.

The western spruce budworm is a damaging defoliator in British Columbia. Budworm feeding damage includes killing of mined buds by early-instar larvae and stripping of the current year's foliage primarily in the upper crown by mid- to late-instar larvae.

Budworms often consume only parts of needles and chew them off at their bases. Vol no Development of western spruce budworm on Douglas-fir callus tissue by Beckwith, R. C; Goldfarb, Barry; Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.).

The western spruce budworm feeds primarily on Douglas-fir. True firs, larch and spruce may also be impacted. The caterpillars feed on the new needles, but will move onto the older needles if all new foliage is consumed. Trees appear reddish in colour once needles have been fed upon.

Inwestern spruce budworm activity was highly apparent in Douglas-fir and grand fir forests of the eastern slope of the Cascade Mountains north of I and across parts of northeastern Washington.

Many people noticed defoliated branch tips and tree tops for the first time as an ongoing outbreak spread to include their land or. Development of western spruce budworm on Douglas-fir callus tissue / ([Portland, Or.

( S.W. Pine St., Portland )]: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, []), by R. Beckwith, Barry Goldfarb, and Or.) Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland (page images at HathiTrust). Extensive regions of interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var.

glauca, IDF) forests in North America are being damaged by drought and western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis).This damage is resulting from warmer and drier summers associated with climate change. To test whether defoliated IDF can directly transfer resources to ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosae) Cited by: Spruce budworms and relatives are a group of closely related insects in the genus are serious pests of conifers, such as are nearly forty Choristoneura species, and even more subspecies, or forms, with a complexity of variation among populations found throughout much of the United States and Canada, and about again this number in : Insecta.

Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Program (DFTM) The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a destructive native defoliator of Douglas-fir. Outbreaks of tussock moth occur every ten to twelve years causing significant damage and mortality to Douglas-fir stands in the interior of the province.

Budworm outbreaks may be sustained for 25 years or more. Host trees: Primarily Douglas-fir, with other tree species such as the true firs, larch and to a lesser degree, spruce, also impacted by the western spruce budworm.

Description and life cycle: The western spruce budworm requires one year to complete its life cycle. Choristoneura fumiferana, the eastern spruce budworm, is a species of moth of the family is also commonly referred to as the spruce budworm. It is one of the most destructive native insects in the northern spruce and fir forests of the eastern United States and range is also the widest of all the budworm species.

Eastern spruce budworm populations can experience Family: Tortricidae. spruce budworm is the most destructive pest of spruce and fir forests in North America the larvae are wasteful feeders as they only eat partial needles and then move on to other needles spruce budworm prefers balsam fir, but the name is associated with spruce as white spruce is a more desirable species historically to the forest industry.

Extensive regions of interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca, IDF) forests in North America are being damaged by drought and western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis). Find out information about spruce budworm.

The larva of a common moth, Choristoneura fumiferana, that is a destructive pest primarily of spruce and balsam fir Explanation of spruce budworm Using a geographical information system for the input and analysis of historical western spruce budworm in British Columbia.

), underpined. The spruce budworm is a normal part of forest ecosystems in Canada. However a cyclical surge in population typically occurs every years which can lead to .An epidemic outbreak of a combination of Douglas-fir tussock moth and western spruce budworm occurred south of Cheyenne Mtn.

and spilled into North Cheyenne Cañon in The area nearest Cutler Mountain and Cutler Trail suffered the greatest losses in the Cañon.